As Different as Night and Day – A Tale of Using Zimride to Get from SoCal to NorCal and Back

Travel can be heavily influenced by the people you meet along the way. Depending on who you come into contact with, your experience can be as different as night and day. As a traveler, I am always trying new and different things to meet people and save money while traveling. Please note that as I am adventurous, I am also cautious, and I take safety precautions to the best of my ability when I try out these various services. This past weekend I used a service called Zimride to make my way from Anaheim, SoCal to San Francisco, NorCal, and back. In a mere 48 hours I experienced both the best and the worst of what this site can offer.

I first learned about Zimride from a well-traveled friend who has made his way up and down the coast of California countless times. This site allows people to post their travel routes with the hope of getting either a passenger or a driver who is heading the same direction. It is not a free service, there is a price tag attached to each ride, but it is much cheaper than renting a car or taking a flight, and it is much faster than taking a train or a bus. When I decided I wanted to spend the weekend in San Francisco, I signed up for the site, got in touch with a few drivers, and eventually found a guy who would pick me up at Point A and drop me off at Point B. The guy, Caldwell, seemed like a decent person, but I still made sure we had another passenger as a sort of “safety precaution” so I wouldn’t be alone. As the story unfolds, it would turn out that the passenger would be both a blessing and a curse…

Caldwell picked me up from my floral design course on Friday, and from the get-go he was tense. He had agreed to pick up another girl in LA, but she was anxious about what time he was picking her up, and this was stressing him out. I suggested that maybe we shouldn’t pick her up if he was already getting a bad vibe from her, but he said he needed the money, so I didn’t argue. I wasn’t overjoyed about heading into the heart of LA on Friday at 5pm, but I wasn’t going to start questioning the driver.

It took us nearly 2 hours to pick up the other passenger, Lisa, and by the time we got to her Caldwell had worked himself up to the point of anger. As soon as Lisa got in the car he rudely demanded his money for the ride, which put her on the offensive because the site clearly says that you pay your driver upon arrival to your destination. I worked to diffuse the situation between the two, and Lisa ended up paying him so we could get on our way. Over the course of the next 3 hours I thoroughly enjoyed conversation with Lisa. She had traveled extensively in SouthEast Asia, and as she told tales of her travels I took notes on the many tips she was dispensing with every story. Caldwell did not join in the conversation at any point and I tried to have a few conversations with him, but in all honesty I hated how he would quickly go off on ranting tyrants, and I much preferred conversation with Lisa.

When it came time to fill up the gas tank, Caldwell asked if I would take over driving. I agreed, and when he got in the passenger seat he slammed the seat back into Lisa’s knees, causing her to exclaim, “Hey Man!” At that point, he turned around and went absolutely ballistic. He started screaming in her face and was saying that ever since she got in the car he hadn’t liked her, that she was the type of person who manipulated and disrespected people, and that he didn’t like how she was befriending me to make him look like the bad guy. I tried to diffuse the situation again, but failed this time, and when I suggested he calm down and take a rest, he instead demanded that he was going to drive, so I slid over to the passenger seat, unsure of what was worse: being left at a gas station 2.5 hours from San Francisco, or continuing with a ranting lunatic and most likely making it to my final destination. I chose the latter, but was silently preparing for the worst. I had come from my floral design class, and had packed my florist knife. I slowly reached for the knife to have it ready in case I needed to use it, and I made sure my bags were ready at my feet in case I needed to spring from the car. I sent my location to a few of my friends in San Francisco who were expecting me, and then I settled in to endure the worst drive of my life.

 The next two hours were horrible. Caldwell screamed like a psychopath, and Lisa proceeded to debate back and forth with him. There was no winning. If she would agree he would call her a liar. If she would disagree he would call he a spoiled bitch. He went on and on about the state of America, and his addictive personality, and his emotional instability. But the whole time he was yelling. I stayed out of it as much as possible, only piping in to confirm positive things, like when he would say, “I’m am ADDICT! I just want a fucking drink right now!” and I would reaffirm to him that losing his sobriety over this was not worth it… He seemed to listen to me, but I was still uncomfortable as hell.

When we finally got in to the city he had calmed. Lisa got out at my stop, even though it was not her destination. We hugged and she thanked me for “being an angel” during the situation. It’s kind of ironic, because during one of his rants, Caldwell was yelling, “And now you two will probably be friends and say things like, ‘Remember that crazy guy who gave us the ride to San Francisco?!'” And he’s probably right. When you survive a situation like that with someone, there is a bond. I honestly think if she had not been in the car, I would not have had a problem with him. Sure, I would have been bored to death with his conversation, but I would not have been scared for my life.

I had originally signed up for a ride there and back with Caldwell, but when he dropped me off, both he and I knew that there was no way in hell I was riding back with him. This meant that on Saturday I had to begin searching for a ride home on Sunday. I figured I wouldn’t have a “rotten egg” twice in a row, so I used Zimride again. Eventually I connected with someone and saw that he too had a passenger for the ride down to LA, so I confirmed.  I am happy to say that my ride back was fantastic.

On the ride back, we were all basically first time Zimride users, and for me, it was a perfect ride: safe, full of conversation and full of cultural exchange. The driver, Anish, was from India and I have just decided that I am going to start my travels next year with a trip to India, so he shared many things about his culture and his country. The passenger, Alex, is from Temecula, where I actually spent 6 months living back in 2010. He had just spent the past two years teaching English in Korea, and had a ton to share about traveling in Asia, which is exactly where I plan to head after India. The three of us were really happy to meet one another, and we all exchanged information so we could keep in touch. They were both full of supportive ideas when I told them I am getting started with blogging, so I’ll give them both a little shoutout right now- hey guys! It was great to meet you!

 The world is full of many different people, and that’s what makes it such an interesting place. The people you meet along the way can add such a different dynamic to your travels and your experiences, and I am happy to have ended my weekend trip on a positive note. I will never forget my first experience with Zimride. The differences between the first and the second ride were like night and day. I had a taste of the good, the bad, and the ugly, but all in all I wouldn’t hesitate to use the service again.

Traveling is like being on a roller coaster – it can be a fun, yet scary, ride. Here at the top of the hills in San Francisco, you can feel as though you’re at the top of a roller coaster with hills and tracks like these.

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